Gilbert Keith Chesterton: Twelve Types

Twelve unrelated essays, each about a particular person: Charlotte Brontë, William Morris, Lord Byron, Alexander Pope, Francesco d’Assisi, Edmond Rostand, Charles II, Robert Louis Stevenson, Thomas Carlyle, Лев Николаевич Толстой, Girolamo Savonarola and Walter Scott.

In general average Chesterton: good but not exceedingly so, sometimes to be agreed, sometimes disagreed with. However, I learned more than usual: First, who was William Morris. Second, that Pope was a satirist, rather than a Romantic. Third, the interesting paradox “that we cannot imagine a space that is infinite, and that we cannot imagine a space that is finite”.

And fourth, that the popular perception of medieval monks as gloomy on account of their asceticism may be as mistaken as a perception of sportsmen as gloomy on account of their asceticism, the only difference being that “we do feel the love of sport; we do not feel the love of religious offices. We see only the price in the one case and only the purchase in the other.”

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s